Like most of our clients, we don't have the luxury of being able to sit on the fence

 
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思想
Counter-fraud is the new arms race
 
 
Counter-fraud is the new arms race
 
 

Fraud, malfeasance, corruption and theft can feel like it’s increasing – but the only way to truly understand it is through the lens of an arms race.  The incidence of such crime is difficult to measure, but there can be little doubt that increasingly complex tools and techniques – much of it digital – is significantly increasing the damage each incident does to an organisation as well as the losses incurred. As the adversary fields more advanced weaponry, so must we. 

Simon Davison
Director, Consulting & Investigations
 


Prevention is the best cure; however, there will always be bad apples, no matter how you organise the cart.

 
 


This could be through various guises – both blatant and underhand theft, corruption, voluntarily assisting organised crime, and fraud. Perpetrators conduct themselves safe in the knowledge that the company processes are unlikely to identify their actions until it is too late, the police do not have the capacity to investigate many of these crimes, and furthermore obtaining definitive proof can be difficult, costly and time consuming. 
From years of experience in dealing with organised criminality, we know that a comprehensive overt investigation, with a tailored covert response, is the most likely solution to identify perpetrators, obtain the evidence to prove their wrongdoing, and ultimately either dismiss or convict those responsible.


Overt investigation is crucial; but must be done in a way that bears scrutiny at court or an employment tribunal. Through the interviewing of witnesses, the examination of relevant documentation and data, and analysis of open source media and big data, AnotherDay can establish the core facts around a breach of security and trust. 


However, this can often lead to more of a challenge. Who actually used the computer where the breach took place? Who actually took the items? Who was meeting the rival company and passing on the sensitive data?
This is where an intelligent, customised covert approach will provide a complete package to plug the evidential gaps. This is an integral part to a professional investigation to fully identify all those involved in a breach of trust, and provide overwhelming evidence to support any decisions you make. Nowhere was this more seen than the Flying Squad Hatton Garden heist investigation – fully conversant with conventional police investigations, the suspects left very few evidential leads. However, following extensive surveillance, technical methodology and with expert investigators, overwhelming evidence was obtained leading to convictions of all those involved in the conspiracy, and a huge amount of stolen property recovered. 


AnotherDay gives you that elite skill set, tailored to your needs. We will help you in obtaining evidence and intelligence to help make key decisions on your future security, safe in the knowledge that all the available facts are at your fingertips, and work with you to ensure these problems don’t arise again. 
 

 
 
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The challenges of securing a global lifestyle
 
 
The challenges of securing a global lifestyle
 
 

Too often, security is regarded as a physical measure such as having a bodyguard, improved door locks, installing a CCTV, or traveling in an armored car. However, genuine security starts with building an intelligence picture about the real time threats that you could face before implementing counter-measures. For most of us, these security threats are relatively low and basic measures can improve our security and peace of mind.

James Glancy
CEO
 

Small steps such as turning off geo-tagging on social media, properly vetting people that have access to our personal lives and conducting research before visiting a foreign country are simple acts to improve your safety.

 
 

High net-worth individuals and celebrities whose lives expose them to regular world travel and interaction with large numbers of people need to approach their security with the detail of a government intelligence agency because they are targets for organized crime.

While having a muscular man-mountain next to them might be image appropriate and provide some peace of mind when clubbing in New York, they are no match for sophisticated international crime networks as was proven in the case of Aparecida Schunk, Bernie Ecclestone’s Mother in Law who was kidnapped in Brazil.

It turned out to be her helicopter pilot that provided the vital information to a local OCN. The only way to counter sophisticated crime networks is to get into the mindset of how they operate and then understand your own weaknesses. A full life security review by an intelligence based security company is essential. Staff must be vetted, physical and cyber security penetration conducted on properties and social media, and diligent close protection staff with international security experience hired and allowed to closely integrate intelligent security measures into their lifestyle.

A gulf has emerged in the security market between security companies established by former professionals from national government security services who understand the techniques needed to counter terrorist and serious organized crime networks, and the celebrity bodyguard and nightclub bouncer who offer immediate physical protection from doting fans and the occasional oddball, but little in the way of genuine security.

In many celebrities’ circumstances, it is common sense that would provide the greatest cloak of safety. But their lives can become so sheltered from everyday realities that common sense is the least common part of their lives–or in Kardashian’s case, in the lives of her bodyguards.

 
 
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Child trafficking, exploitation and the globalisation of crime
 
 
Child trafficking, exploitation and the globalisation of crime
 
 

In the modern world it’s normal for organised crime and other security threats to be transnational and multi-factor issues which impact societies, economies and global politics. Crimes such as child trafficking child sexual exploitation (CSE) or human trafficking have no borders, and organised crime groups have found these to be extremely profitable and low risk, being able to ‘sell’ or ‘rent’ a victim countless times, unlike other ‘products’.

Ana Vigil Haro
Associate
 

Increasing evidence point to the involvement of organised crime networks in child sexual exploitation, estimating that a victim earns USD 250,000 per year for their abuser.

 
 

Technological advances have exponentially increased the incidence of CSE, and new recording equipment which is now available to practically anyone facilitates the creation of better quality material. The internet and dark web has enabled the creation of networks that facilitate and make 'safer' the production and distribution of such material and to exchange information on how to target minors and avoid being detected by Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs).

The new technological environment in which CSE flourishes requires specialized techniques, expertise, tools and training, which require governments to increase their fund allocation significantly. Countries with more capabilities, equipment and better trained officials must undertake capability building and determine viable equal standards for forensic evidence.  In order to make a real attempt to successfully combat these crimes, it is crucial to exchange information worldwide.

Policy makers must tread the line between freedom of speech, the right to privacy, censorship and combating criminal activity. International cooperation and information sharing networks that aim to make the investigations of these crimes more efficient, quicker and more effective are essential. Joint action from countries, the international community, businesses, NGOs and citizens is needed to effectively combat the issue. Protecting minors is a test for every country and a strong indicator of it’s ability to combat other forms of crime: it is a test that we must pass.

 
 
思想
An anatomy of a world which is losing control
 
 
An anatomy of a world which is losing control
 
 

Recent events in Turkey have demonstrated three things: a split military which does not have enough control to take the country, a president that does not have enough control to prevent a coup, and a world which does not have enough control to understand and interpret the volumes of 'fact' and 'opinion' created by such a shock.

Jake Hernandez
Global Consulting Director
 

Our social media analytics and remote detection technologies allowed us to monitor these events so closely it almost made us uncomfortable - pushing this out to clients is the easy part. But what good does this do without the context of how our clients might use it?

 
 

Telling the difference between fact, fiction, and the vast data in between is not just a problem for us - a changed 'information landscape' in which expertise and objective truth is judged to be secondary has become a key trend in 2016, exemplified by the recent US presidential primaries and the debate over 'Brexit' in the UK. Recent events centred on Istanbul and Ankara have shown that this could be having an effect on traditional power structures - how can anyone have semblance of control without a firm understanding of what is really happening and what is not?

We think we will begin to see this more and more - events which are born through a misunderstanding of the overall political environment, a fate suffered by both Turkish loyalists and rebel factions, and most importantly events which are now shaped through a world which is contantly awake and watching events live through a microscope. The key question for us is how do we provide a valuable service in making sense of the noise.

Our recent assessments of events in Turkey are based on what we see in front of us - raw video and imagery that we can analyse and extrapolate to come up with an outcome. But what then? It has also showed us that the dynamic around 'threat intelligence' must change. Without a detailed understanding of our clients and their operations such generic information is worthless, and only by applying it to our clients' real world problems can it go from being useful information to actionable intelligence. Understanding the difference is key.

We're proud to say that our monitoring supported clients during this difficult period and had a tangible effect on decision-making - but as many around the world are realising, when it comes to the new information landscape, we will have to be committed in reframing the way we use and understand information. You should be too.

 

 

 

 
 
思想
To build capacity, dismantle the challenge.
 
 
To build capacity, dismantle the challenge.
 
 

Governments invest huge amounts of money in security training and capacity building.  But it’s our contention that a lot of that money is being spent inefficiently.  

Jake Hernandez
Global Consulting Director
 

What’s required is a much more nuanced approach to training and development, led by a coherent strategy linked to specific outcomes.

 
 

There’s three reasons why we believe most government and security forces training programmes aren't up to scratch.  Firstly, too many of the training products that are on the market are too generic.  Secondly, too often entire swathes of personnel are being trained in aspects of security that are unnecessary for the specificity of the threats that the country is likely to encounter. And, thirdly, the training is conducted by companies who follow a Western security ethos, that, although proven to deliver results in the short term, often lacks the cultural understanding to make its effects live long in the future.

By investing in better analysis of the security outlook that the Government forces will likely to have to face in the future, at the beginning of a capacity build,  we can deliver significant reductions in expenditure during the roll-out phase.

At AnotherDay we build-in an economical but enlightening consultation phase at the beginning of our capacity building projects.  This gives our clients a much clearer picture of their training and development priorities.  But as well as informing what’s needed, the addition of upfront strategy determines how best the training should be conducted.  With the ability to tailor the training products we’ve created, we can then deploy the learning methodology in a way that uniquely pairs with the requirement and fits with the inherent culture of the organisation and the country it represents .  The right skills, in the right format for the right outlook, that’s the capacity we’re building.

 
 
思想
Why investing in the front line adds value to the top line
 
 
Why investing in the front line adds value to the top line
 
 

It’s easy to think of strategic security as a sunk cost – necessary expenditure it may be, but a recoupable value-add to the business, it would often appear not.  

James Glancy
Chief Executive Officer
 

At AnotherDay our aim is to deliver security services in a manner that isn’t just sympathetic to the commercial realities of business, but that can actually help safeguard shareholder value.  

 
 

By combining a company’s specific financial data with our analysis of the security characteristics the company has in play/is developing, we have been perfecting the means to develop a “resilience dividend”. 

When financial analysts consider the value of a company, there are a host of factors that they take into account to ensure the company has strong governance.  As the global security environment continues its pattern of uncertainty, we’re convinced that the company’s security strategy will increasingly become considered as part of these assessments.  By working to establish a transparent methodology to evaluate a company’s security endeavours, we’re helping companies equip themselves for what we see as this inevitable new line of enquiry.